Speakers of the Workshop on Systems Biology

 Speaker

 Professor R. Dean Astumian

 Affiliation

 Department of Physics, University of Maine, Orono, Me, USA

 E- Mail

 astumian@maine.edu

 Website

 http://biophys2.umephy.maine.edu/astumian/about.html

 Title

 Brownian Motors or To be Announced

 Abstract

    

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 Speaker

 Professor Hoong-Chien Lee

 Affiliation

 Department of Physics/ Department of Life Sciences/ Center for Complex Systems, National Central University, Chungli 320, TAIWAN

 E- Mail

 hclee@phy.ncu.edu.tw

 Website

 http://www.phy.ncu.edu.tw/hclee/index.html

 Title

 information and genomes

 Abstract

     Shannon information in the genomes of all completely sequenced prokaryotes and eukaryotes are measured in word lengths of  two to ten letters. It is found that in a scale-dependent way, the Shannon information in complete genomes are much greater - thousands  of times in the case of short words -than that in matching random  sequences. Furthermore, the Shannon information in all available complete genomes belong to two universality classes given by an extremely simple formula. Plasmodium alone belongs to one class and all the other genomes belong to the other class. The data are consistent  with a model for genome growth composed of two main ingredients:  random homologous duplications that increase the Shannon information  in a scale-independent way, and random point mutations that  preferentially reduces the larger-scale Shannon information. The inference is that the large-scale and coarse-grained growth of genomes was selectively neutral and this suggests an independent corroboration of Kimura's neutral theory of evolution.

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 Speaker

 Professor Herbert Levine

 Affiliation

 University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319, USA

 E- Mail

 hlevine@ucsd.edu

 Website

 http://herbie.ucsd.edu/~levine/

 Title

 Pattern Formations in Biology

 Abstract

     The dynamics of spatially-extended biological systems is a meeting point for non-equilibrium physics and chemistry on the one hand and the complexity of cellular and developmental biology on the other. This talk will focus on several examples where one must use concepts from physics to make sense of experimental observations in living systems and to thereafter make predictive models of the relevant processes. These examples range from microorganism colonies (both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes) to intracellular calcium signaling. The relevant physics emerges from ideas regarding diffusion-limited growth, the concept of an excitable media, and the relatively new paradigm of self-organization of self-propelled objects.

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 Speaker

 Professor Marcelo Magnasco

 Affiliation

 Professor and Head, Mathematical Physics Lab, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, NY NY10021, USA

 E- Mail

 magnasco@rockefeller.edu

 Website

 http://asterion.rockefeller.edu/marcelo/marcelo.html

 Title

 Physics of Hearing

 Abstract

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